Nanticoke City
Current News - 2020
Archives
2002 || 2003 || 2004 || 2005 || 2006 || 2007 || 2008 || 2009 || 2010 || 2011 || 2012 || 2013 || 2014 || 2015 || 2016 || 2017 || 2018 || 2019
As we receive information from the Times Leader , Citizens' Voice or any other news outlet we will post it here.
Nanticoke City webdesign note: The articles and information you see on this site are from articles that are taken from the Times Leader or Citizen Voice newspapers & other sources. If some articles are not added we accept no responsibility for not seeing them on the day they were published. Thank You.
1/26/2020
Pioneering Nanticoke doctor laid to rest
smocarsky@citizensvoice.com

Dr. Stanley Dudrick, known worldwide as “the father of intravenous feeding,” was remembered by his namesake as genuine, sincere, passionate and determined at a funeral Mass celebrated in his memory Saturday in his hometown.
Dudrick’s son Stanley eulogized his father near the end of the Mass at St. Faustina Parish on South Hanover Street.
Dudrick, 84, died last weekend at his home in Eaton, New Hampshire, following an illness. When news of his death spread, friends, colleagues and admirers took to social media to offer condolences and heap praise on a man credited for saving countless lives around the world.
He developed total parenteral nutrition while he was serving as a surgical resident at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital from 1961 to 1966.
Dudrick’s son said his father “worked diligently, tirelessly,” yet he was “always caring and loving.”
“A popular phrase to describe my father is that he touched so many people. Indeed he did, from all walks of life, every gender, race, creed and color,” Dudrick said. “He had … a keen perceptiveness, where he could find a connection with anyone and everyone.”
The Rev. James Nash, pastor of St. Faustina Parish, celebrated the Mass of Christian Burial. In his homily, he focused on a passage from the Gospel of Luke in which Christ told his disciple Simon to take their boat out deeper into the sea to catch fish after an unsuccessful night of fishing.
“That’s what Dr. Dudrick did all of his life. He was never satisfied with just what he had, he wanted to go deeper and deeper and deeper,” Nash said after Mass, explaining the theme of his homily.
“One of his greatest accomplishments was inventing the feeding tube. Before that, people were coming out of successful surgery and dying because they didn’t have nutrition. So he went out on a limb, went out deeper, and developed this process. And it’s considered to be one of the greatest developments in the medical field,” he said.
Nash said Dudrick could have spent the rest of his life basking in fame and sitting on his laurels after his accomplishment, but he didn’t.
“He didn’t even go for a patent. He went on with his life. One of the things he did later was directing the physician’s assistant program at Misericordia University. After that, he was a professor at the (Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine). So he always kept on going out deeper and deeper and deeper. His love for his medical profession was a dedication through his whole life,” Nash said.
Nash described Dudrick as somebody who knew everybody.
“He reached out to everyone,” Nash said. “He knew the name of the elevator operator in medical school, he’d know the names of the maintenance staff guys. He was a people person, and all he wanted to do was bring comfort to people’s lives.”
Nash noted that Dudrick was content living a “simple life. He could have been a billionaire if he wanted to be, but he was more just dedicated to his profession. And here in Nanticoke, he’s kind of like one of our legends.”
In July 2017, city and state officials honored Dudrick and placed an historical marker outside his childhood home on West Union Street to celebrate the 50th anniversary of his invention.
“He always lived a very simple, humble life,” Nash said. “It never went to his head.”

1/21/2020
People across the globe pay tribute to Nanticoke native, renowned physician
bkalinowski@citizensvoice.com

Tributes to the late Dr. Stanley Dudrick are pouring in from all over the world following the death of the Nanticoke native who revolutionized medicine in the 1960s.
Dudrick, who invented the intravenous feeding method known as total parenteral nutrition (TPN), is considered one of the most influential doctors in world history, credited with saving millions of lives.
Colleagues, friends and admirers from all over the globe have taken to social media to mourn his loss.
“Sad to hear the news out of the U.S. of the passing of Dr. Stanley Dudrick, the father of parenteral nutrition,” Dr. Peter Collins, a dietician and professor from Brisbane, Australia, wrote on Twitter. “A giant in the field of clinical nutrition and who would have contributed to saving countless lives.”
Dr. Paul Wischmeyer, an anesthesiologist at Duke University, on Twitter called Dudrick “one of my true heroes.”
“I was honored to call him a mentor and friend,” Wischmeyer wrote. “I will never forget our talks and wise advice. His life should be celebrated and never forgotten.”
Last year, Wischmeyer was named an honorary fellow for the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN), one of its biggest honors. Dudrick was a co-founder of ASPEN and served as its first president.
“With the passing of Dr. Dudrick, medicine has lost one of its most inspirational leaders,” ASPEN President Lingtak-Neander Chan said. “Dr. Dudrick will be remembered as a healer and visionary, whose kindness has deeply touched many people.”
Dudrick, the descendant of Nanticoke coal miners, invented TPN at age 32 while a surgical resident at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia — a medical advancement on par with open heart surgery and organ transplantation.
The school’s department of surgery posted on Twitter that it “mourns the passing of ‘The Father of Intravenous Feeding’ Dr. Stanley Dudrick.”
“He is ranked among the most influential doctors in world history for inventing TPN as a surgical resident here @PennMedicine. He is credited with saving millions of lives,” the Twitter post said.
A search of Twitter tributes to Dudrick yields results in various languages.
“We regret the loss of this great professional and human being,” the Colombian Association of Clinical Nutrition wrote in Spanish.
A medical student posted a tribute in Arabic with a meme saying Dudrick was “the man who fed starving patients when no one else could.”
Alberto Gonzalez Chavez, chief surgical resident at Hospital Español de México in Mexico City, praised Dudrick as “surgeon of the century.”
Dudrick, always proud of his Nanticoke roots, intended to return to the Wyoming Valley to practice medicine after school, but after his invention, his skill level was too far advanced for local hospitals.
After his storied medical career, Dudrick returned to the area in 2011. Dudrick became director of the physician assistant program at Misericordia University and was hired as a professor of surgery at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine.
“Stan Dudrick was internationally known as a physician who changed the lives of countless people through his pioneering work,” Misericordia University President Thomas J. Botzman said. “Moreover, he was a lifelong teacher of others as he sought to share his excitement and enthusiasm for bettering the lives of others. He was an incredible friend to all at Misericordia University and will fondly be remembered as a humble physician from Nanticoke who changed the world to be a better place.”

1/20/2020
Nanticoke native, one of most influential physicians in history, dies at 84
bkalinowski@citizensvoice.com

Dr. Stanley Dudrick, a Nanticoke native who went on to become one of the most influential physicians in the world, has died. He was 84.
Dudrick invented the intravenous feeding method known as total parenteral nutrition — credited with saving millions of lives — as a young doctor.
He died over the weekend at his home in Eaton, New Hampshire, following an illness, according to his cousin Jack Dudrick, of Nanticoke.
“When you were in his presence, you felt like you were in the presence of greatness,” Jack Dudrick said Sunday.
The descendant of Nanticoke coal miners, Dudrick never forgot his roots — having grown up in a double-block home his father built on West Union Street.
“He was very proud of being from Nanticoke,” Jack Dudrick said. “We were obviously thrilled every time he came back to Nanticoke. Everyone would make sure they made it a point to see him.”
Stanley Dudrick last visited in May, he said.
Legacy
Known as the “father of intravenous feeding,” Dudrick is constantly ranked among the most influential doctors in world history for his pioneering work, which he unveiled in July 1967 at age 32.
Dudrick invented TPN while a surgical resident at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia.
Colleagues have said Dudrick’s contribution to medicine ranks in importance with the development of open heart surgery and organ transplantation.
In a 2017 article describing Dudrick’s place among the 50 most influential doctors in history, Dr. Robert Jarrett wrote: “Before Dr. Dudrick’s work there were many infants and children who we had to watch literally starve to death because something was preventing their bowels from absorbing nutrition.”
Dudrick believed in his work so much he decided not to patent it — which might have made him a billionaire.
“Like Jonas Salk, (the inventor of the polio vaccine), he didn’t patent anything,” Jack Dudrick said. “He said he created over 200 millionaires because of his invention.”
Coming home
Dudrick became a professor of surgery at Penn. He helped launch the surgery department of the University of Texas Medical School and became chief of surgery at the university’s hospital. He was named chairman of the surgery department at Pennsylvania Hospital, the oldest in the nation. Later, he was tapped as surgery department chairman at the Yale University School of Medicine.
But Dudrick always longed to come back home. And in 2011, he did.
Dudrick became director of the physician assistant program at Misericordia University and was hired as a professor of surgery at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine.
In July 2017, to mark the 50th anniversary of Dudrick’s life-saving invention, Nanticoke officials recognized a “Dr. Dudrick Day” in the city and unveiled a historical marker outside his childhood home.
Tributes
Dudrick inspired his students, said Ida Castro, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine’s vice president of community engagement.
“Even though he might have been ill, he might have been weak, he would come and dedicate so many hours to their development and nurture their curiosity,” she said.
Alan Goldstein, a Clarks Summit real estate developer, met Dudrick at the medical school, where Goldstein was a volunteer and donor.
They became fast friends.
“Stan was known throughout the world,” Goldstein said. “He developed procedures all the doctors said could not be developed.”
Goldstein described Dudrick as humble.
“You would think he was a regular guy off the street,” Goldstein said. “He was never impressed with himself. He was down to earth. His death is a loss to the whole world.”
State Sen. John Yudichak, I-14, Plymouth Twp., praised Dudrick for the millions of lives he saved.
“Few in the annals of medical history have contributed more to the preservation of life through research and medical advancements than Dr. Dudrick,” Yudichak said.
Nanticoke City Manager Donna Wall said she was “deeply saddened” to hear of Dudrick’s death.
“He was a very special, humble man who never forgot his roots in Nanticoke,” Wall said. “I feel fortunate to have known him. He surely will be missed.”
ERIC MARK and JON O’CONNELL, staff writers, contributed to this report.

1/18/2020
Historic Nanticoke building condemned, will be razed
bkalinowski@citizensvoice.com

City officials on Friday condemned a historic building on East Main Street that already was being eyed for demolition to make way for a downtown redevelopment project.
The dilapidated property at 101-107 E. Main St. sustained a roof collapse and the side of the building facing Shea Street started to crumble, City Manager Donna Wall said.
Barricades have been placed around the building and Shea Street, which leads to East Main Street, is closed until the building can be razed.
The Nanticoke City Municipal Authority, which purchased the property last month for $200,000 from Relic Rack Inc., sought emergency bids for demolition and the work could begin as soon as Tuesday.
“The building is in rough condition and the city wants it taken down and the municipal authority will comply,” said Sara Hailstone, a consultant for the authority.
Hailstone said the municipal authority purchased the building because members “considered it a key location in the city and important for the revitalization of the downtown.”
An old bank building next to the property is not part of the demolition.
The property to be razed was built in 1902 and was first home to the Jacob A. Morgan Hotel and Saloon, according to Chet Zaremba, vice president of the Nanticoke Historical Society.
“That would make it one of the oldest buildings in the city,” Zaremba said.
Over the years, the building housed various others businesses, such as Harry Gottlieb’s Modern Emporium, the William Janowicz Hotel, Sam Weisberger’s Leader Store, the Stauss Million Dollar Store, Gem Furniture, Joseph’s Furniture and Geri’s Draperies, Zaremba said.
“That building has been there forever,” Zaremba said. “It’s a shame to see it go.”

1/16/2020
Roke sworn in as new Nanticoke police chief
spanny@citizensvoice.com

With his wife Kelly holding the Bible, and family, friends and coworkers watching from around the Nanticoke Municipal Building, Michael Roke was sworn in as the new police chief Wednesday night.
“It’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience. That’s for sure,” Roke said. “We’ve been speaking about this now for a few months, and it’s great to get to the point where we can start implementing some of our plans.”
Kevin Coughlin, Nanticoke’s newly inaugurated mayor, said Roke — previously a lieutenant — has almost 25 years of experience on the job. Although Robert Lehman has served as the interim chief since the end of August, Coughlin said Lehman’s detective skills were too valuable.
Coughlin said Lehman and Roke were the only two who applied for the position.
“He is a terrific detective,” Coughlin said of Lehman. “I’d rather have someone like that out on the streets doing work for the citizens of the city.”
Coughlin said Roke brings “a lot of energy to the job” and, as the city is going to be “coming down” on dilapidated properties, he said Roke has a lot of good ideas. Coughlin added that Roke was “assertive” and will get the job done.
Roke’s first act as police chief was taking care of a parking violation issue right in the municipal meeting room. A concerned citizen brought up multiple parking violations in front of his home, and Roke responded by assuring the Nanticoke resident the cars would be taken care of.
Coughlin said watching Roke handle the issue strengthened his faith in Roke.
“It’s one of our goals to go forward with the junk vehicles that are on properties that are problematic,” Roke said. “I’ve spoken with the mayor since he’s been inaugurated, and that’s one of the things that we did do to forward the agenda.”
Roke said there are plans set up to work hand-in-hand with code enforcement to address the status of properties, and he also plans to tackle the drug problem in Nanticoke.
“I appreciate the confidence the mayor and council have for me,” Roke said. “We’re certainly going to try to move the city forward.”

1/15/2020
Huber Breaker film draws large crowd to world premiere
bkalinowski@citizensvoice.com

As footage of the Huber Breaker crashing down on demolition day played on a screen Tuesday night, some in the audience gasped. Some even cried.
A short documentary film about the former coal breaker in Ashley, the last to remain standing in the Wyoming Valley, made its debut at the St. Faustina Cultural Center, drawing a large crowd of people proud of the region’s anthracite heritage.
Organizers set up 200 chairs for the event. All seats were filled and dozens of others stood for the 28-minute film, entitled “Beyond the Breaker.”
“Wow, what a crowd. Thanks for coming everybody,” said Chet Zaremba, vice president of the Nanticoke Historical Society, which hosted the event. “We didn’t anticipate anything like this. We are honored to host this world premiere.”
Zaremba said there was a certain irony in the film debuting at the cultural center, the former St. Stanislaus Church on Church Street.
St. Stanislaus was the first Polish Catholic church in Luzerne County, built in 1886 by Nanticoke coal miners, Zaremba said.
Mining historian Bob Wolensky, who was featured in the film, said the film drew a “stupendous turnout.”
The film includes some history of the breaker, but mainly focuses on local people lamenting the fact the breaker could not be saved prior to its demolition for scrap metal in April 2014.
Philadelphia photographer John Welsh and fellow filmmaker, Alana Mauger of Gilbertsville in Montgomery County, spent nearly eight years making the film.
“We’re not from here. We came here and everyone was so kind and welcoming,” Mauger said. “Now it feels like a second home.”
The film features extensive amounts of drone footage from around the breaker in the years before it was torn down.
Welsh and Mauger plan to enter the documentary in several film festivals over the next year before they will be able to make it available to the public online or on DVD.
One of the most notable characters in the film is Ray Clarke, chairman of the Huber Breaker Preservation Society.
He is a part of one of the most dramatic parts of the film when heavy equipment helps bring the breaker to the ground, causing a plume of smoke to rise into the Ashley sky.
Clarke was filming at the time.
He soon called the filmmakers and the audio of the call was played during the film.
“It’s all under rubble,” Clarke told them. “The sad part about it is my camera was on.”
Another person featured prominently in the film is Back Mountain artist Sue Hand, who has created nearly 90 pieces of art about coal breakers in the region, including some of the Huber Breaker.
“When they tore the Huber down, it was like watching someone get killed,” Hand said in the film. “How can you be so insensitive to the past?”
Welsh said the film took so long to complete because they were looking for a good ending.
Then, last year, Hand hosted a gallery of her work on coal breakers at King’s College.
The film ended with interviews taken while the gallery was at King’s.
“There wasn’t a preservation of the breaker, but there sort of was in that gallery that night,” Welsh said.

1/10/2020
New film explores Huber Breaker’s role in history
bkalinowski@citizensvoice.com

While searching the internet years ago about coal mining, Philadelphia photographer John Welsh came across a photo of the Huber Breaker in Ashley.
He didn’t know the significance of the coal mining facility that once dotted Northeastern Pennsylvania’s landscape, but was still intrigued enough to make a visit.
After the visit in 2012, he decided to make a documentary about the breaker — the last one standing in the Wyoming Valley prior to its demolition in 2014 for scrap metal.
“That’s how it got started. It was kind of random,” Welsh said. “I know my grandmother had coal in her house, but that was all I knew about coal.”
Welsh and fellow filmmaker, Alana Mauger of Gilbertsville in Montgomery County, are set to debut their film “Beyond the Breaker” next week in Nanticoke — once a thriving hub of coal mining.
The film, which is free and open to the public, will debut at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the St. Faustina Cultural Center at 38 W. Church St. in Nanticoke — the former St. Stanislaus Church.
“I’m hoping people are going to appreciate the time we took to tell the story,” Welsh said. “It represents a culture that’s being lost.”
The film is 28 minutes and contains interviews with about 30 people.
It took this long to complete the project because the filmmakers wanted the perfect ending to the story, Welsh said.
Welsh said the ending will be a secret until the film debuts.
“I don’t want to give away the ending. It took us until 2019 to find a natural end to the story — and we got lucky. We wanted to make sure it was the right ending,” Welsh said.
The filmmakers used a drone camera to fly inside the breaker to get never before seen video.
Bob Wolensky, a local anthracite mining historian, consulted the filmmakers on the project and appears in the documentary.
“I encouraged them to think about the Huber as more than just a physical plant. The breaker was a real important symbol of community, people, work and the anthracite industry. It was bigger than a coal processing plant,” Wolensky said. “They have been working on this for 10 years. They really stayed with it.”
The film is one of 17 local events to commemorate January as Anthracite Mining Heritage Month.
For years, the Huber Breaker Preservation Society tried to save the breaker and make it a museum. But the property eventually was sold for scrap metal 2014 when efforts failed. Now, a memorial park is on site.
Chet Zaremba of the Nanticoke Historical Society will serve as emcee of Tuesday’s event. He used to work at the breaker in the billing office before joining the Pennsylvania State Police.
He remembers the breaker as a huge hub of activity.
“The coal industry, even in the latter days, was still an intricate organization to get everything going — from the mining to the processing to the shipping to the billing,” Zaremba said. “It’s very interesting to me, having been there to see the operation.”

IF YOU GO: The documentary film “Beyond the Breaker” about the former Huber Breaker in Ashley will debut at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the St. Faustina Cultural Center at 38 W. Church St., Nanticoke - the former St. Stanislaus Church. The event is free and open to the public.

1/7/2020
Two towns, two mayors, two brothers: Coughlin siblings lead Nanticoke, Plymouth
kcarroll@timesleader.com

On either side of the Susquehanna River in Luzerne County, there is now a mayor named Coughlin.
Kevin Coughlin was sworn in as the new mayor of Nanticoke City on Monday night while his brother Frank Coughlin watched on.
Frank is no stranger to such ceremonies — after all, he had just participated in one less than an hour earlier in Plymouth Borough, where he is the mayor.
“I don’t know how many areas have two brothers as mayor in a five- or six-mile radius,” said Frank before Plymouth’s council meeting and swearing-in ceremony.
Frank was appointed mayor back in October, filling the unexpired term of the late former mayor Thomas McTague.
“I didn’t want to become mayor under the circumstances with Mayor McTague passing away,” said Coughlin. “He’s sorely missed around this town.”
One of the big issues that Coughlin has undertaken as mayor is the revitalization of downtown Plymouth.
“We’re moving along,” Coughlin said. “We have a lot of things coming up.”
Monday’s meeting in Plymouth also saw the swearing-in of council members. The winners of three council seats in November’s election were incumbent Democrats Bill Dixon and John Thomas, with 18-year-old Republican Alec Ryncavage edging out Democrat Adam Morehart for the third seat.
Ryncavage is also focused on the future of downtown Plymouth.
“It’s going to be an effort from the entire council to revitalize downtown,” Ryncavage said. “The objective of the council and the town government as a whole is to make the town easier to live in and work in.”
Coughlin had praise for council’s newest addition.
“I see a lot of potential in him,” Coughlin said of Ryncavage.
Plymouth’s meeting went on after the swearing-in but Frank couldn’t stick around, as he had to get across the river to Nanticoke for his brother’s inauguration.
Kevin Coughlin, like his brother, served on the city council prior to becoming the mayor. He was Nanticoke City Council’s vice president, whereas Frank was the borough council president in Plymouth up until the time he was appointed mayor.
“I decided I wanted to be mayor last year,” said Kevin Coughlin after the meeting. “There were just a few things that I thought I could improve on.”
As his family looked on, including his brother, Coughlin took the oath of office and officially assumed the position of mayor, just three months after Frank took office in Plymouth. Kevin’s father-in-law, the late Stanley Glazenski, also served as mayor of Nanticoke City, and was sworn in on the same Bible that Kevin used.
“I feel proud,” Kevin Coughlin said. “I think if our dad were alive, he’d be really proud, too.”
“He’ll be good to Nanticoke,” said Frank Coughlin. “Hopefully the two towns could do some sort of partnership down the line.”

1/5/2020
South Valley Parkway project delay frustrates business owners
dallabaugh@citizensvoice.com

Editor’s Note: As part of The Citizens’ Voice Ask the Voice feature, a reader asked when the South Valley Parkway project would be completed.
For months, Grateful Roast owners Brian Williams and Sarah Kratz said road closures as a result of the
$90 million South Valley Parkway project have negatively impacted their business.
The husband and wife own a cafe and specialty coffee roaster at 400 Middle Road in Nanticoke and are frustrated that road closures continue as another roundabout is still being constructed in Hanover Twp.
“It’s awful,” Kratz said. “On top of the fact that road is not open, the signs that the road is closed are not there and that makes it dangerous.”
The roundabout was projected to open in November, but Cody Forgach, chief of staff for State Rep. Gerald Mullery, D-119, Newport Twp., said he doesn’t expect it to open until late January depending on the weather.
The state Department of Transportation will not allow the roundabout to open without lighting and the lights were not shipped yet, Forgach said.
The manufacturer will release the light poles Jan. 10 to the contractor and then they will need an inspection, said PennDOT spokesman Michael Taluto.
Taluto said he is not sure yet when the roundabout will be completed but he should have a better idea after the inspection.
Kriger Construction of Scranton is building the roundabout, marking the seventh one to be constructed in the Hanover Twp. and Nanticoke areas.
It will connect to a new access road leading into warehouses for True Value and Spreetail in the Hanover 9 site across from Luzerne County Community College.
James Marzolino, vice president for Kriger Construction, said there are only two or three suppliers that PennDOT has approved to supply the lights so it took some time but he said the entire South Valley Parkway project is projected to be done “on time and on budget.” The estimated completion date for the entire project is August, he said.
Williams said he welcomes the South Valley Parkway project, the roundabouts and the new warehouses but he’s frustrated with how long it is taking to construct some of the roundabouts.
One of the reasons for the South Valley Parkway project was to take heavy traffic off Middle Road but as a result of the construction, traffic is forced back onto Middle Road, he said. People have been taking down signs that say “road closed,” he said.
Kratz said she also supports progress and having new jobs but she thinks the South Valley Parkway construction project has been “mismanaged” and she calls it a “nightmare.”
She said Grateful Roast is already off the beaten path in Nanticoke and the road closures have made it more difficult for customers to get to their business. People often stop in their business asking for directions, she said.
Kratz credited construction firm Clayco, which has been building warehouses, for sending employees to their business but she said the South Valley Parkway construction project is “something that should have gone much smoother.”
“It’s taking a very long time and it’s hurting our business,” she said. “Little people are struggling. We’re the little guys and it takes a toll on us when we don’t have traffic.”